Good Cause Eviction

What apartments are covered by Good Cause Protections?

If you meet all the conditions below, you may be eligible for “good cause protections”:

  • You do not live in a co-op or condo.
  • You are not rent-regulated.
  • Your landlord must own more than ten (10) units. If your landlord lives in your building and your building is ten units or less you are not covered. You can find out how many units your landlord owns here.
  • Your rent is under 245% of the Fair Market Rate by HUD.
    • Studio: $5,846
    • 1 BR: $6,005
    • 2 BR: $6,742
    • 3 BR: $8,413
    • 4 BR: $9,065
  • Your building was built before 2009.
  • Your apartment is not part of an employment agreement.

There is no directory of what buildings are covered by Good Cause Protections. Starting on August 20, 2024, Landlords must provide a notice at lease signing, renewal leases/rent hikes, a notice of evictions, and petition papers stating why Good Cause does not cover them. 

If a landlord fails to provide necessary notice, eviction cases may be thrown out in court.

How can I find out how many units my landlord owns?

Starting August 20, 2024, your landlord will be required to tell you if he is claiming to be exempt due to number of units they own. Also if your landlord brings you to court and claims to be exempt, the LLC will have to give you the name of everyone who is an owner through the LLC, how many units they own and the addresses of those units.

Due to buildings being owned by limited liability corporations (LLC). It can be complicated to know how many units your landlord owns. One place to start is by searching your building on https://whoownswhat.justfix.nyc/

What rights and protections do with Good Cause Protections?

Good cause protection is a defense in a housing court case. If you meet all the conditions on the previous above, you have the following defenses in court:

  • Rent increases are limited to 5%+CPI or 10%, whichever is less. The current amount is 8.82%.  Housing and Community Renewal (HCR), the state housing agency, will announce it every August.
  • Your landlord can only evict you for the following reasons:
    • Non-payment of rent
    • Violating a term of the lease
    • Nuisance or illegal activity
    • Failure to sign a lease renewal
    • Failure to provide reasonable access to your apartment for repairs or for your landlord to show the apartment for rent or sale.
    • Landlord taking over for personal use
    • Landlord taking the apt off the market
    • Demolition of the building

This protection does not include tenants with cases that were begun on or before April 20, 2024

How can my rent be raised within a Good Cause protected apartment?

Rent increases are limited to a flexible standard of 5%+CPI or 10%, whichever is less. The current amount as of April 2024 is 8.82%.  Housing and Community Renewal (HCR), the state housing agency, will announce it every August. 

What if my rent is raised more than the Good Cause flexible standard?

If your landlord raise your rent more than this years standard you can negotiate with your landlord or you can withhold part or all of your rent and use good cause as a defense in court. The court might find against you, if a landlord can show their costs have risen or if their have done significant repairs to the building.  

Dear landlord, 

I’m writing to you, to let you know that New York State passed Good Cause Eviction on April 20, 2024 and the law went into effect immediately. According to the law, the reasonable threshold for rent increases this year is 8.82%. That percentage would increase my rent to ______.


Please adjust my lease accordingly and send me a new copy to sign.

Sincerely,

[Your name]

On what grounds can I be evicted from a Good Cause protected apartment?

  • Non-payment of rent
    • Like any other tenant, as a rent-stabilized tenant, you can be sued for eviction in Housing Court if you owe back rent. 
  • Violating a substantial obligation of your lease.
    Some examples include but are not limited to:
    • operating a business out of your apartment
    • making alterations to your apartment without permission
    • using appliances such as washing machines that are prohibited in your lease
  • Failure to provide reasonable access to your apartment for repairs or for your landlord to show the apartment for rent or sale.
  • Being a nuisance or illegal activity.
     Examples include:
    • selling drugs
    • constant noise coming from the apartment
    • violent behavior
    • cluttering your apartment to the point that it is a hazard
    • paying your rent late on a chronic basis
  • Limited landlord actions
    • owner-use (the landlord is seeking the apartment for his/her personal use, or that of an family member)
    • Landlord taking the apt off the market
    • whole-building demolition
  • Failure to sign a lease renewal

Do I need a lease to be covered under Good Cause?

No, you do not need a lease to be covered as long as your building meets the criteria to be covered.

What can I do if my landlord refuses to renew my lease or tries to evict when I am protected by Good Cause?

If your landlord refuses to renew your lease, tells you that you have to leave for a reason not listed above or no reason, or tries to evict you for no reason or for a reason not listed above, do not move. Tell your landlord, they need to give youa “Good Cause” to evict you. If your landlord then tries to formally evict you in court, you can raise a Good Cause defense.